Intelligence Analyst as Internal Consultant

 

Authors: Aleksandra Bielska and Chris Pallaris
Event: “AIPIO Intelligence Conference”, Hobart, Australia, 22-24 August 2017

This paper was presented by the authors during the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers (AIPIO) Conference in Hobart, Australia, on 23 August 2017.

Abstract: Analysts are typically employed to address challenges external to the organisation. However, their ability to do so is often hampered by challenges within the organisation they serve. Such challenges include limited planning, poor information management, siloed working, and a failure to implement proper policies and workflows, whether within or between departments. We argue that many of these challenges can be addressed by extending the role of the analytic function to include internal consultancy. Analysts operating as internal consultants would use an extended “playbook” of analytic techniques to help their organisation innovate, collaborate, boost performance and manage change. Internal consultants would also work with their colleagues to foster the skills and disciplines needed by a 21st century workforce grappling with ever-more complex data flows and operating environments.

Extending the analyst’s responsibilities may seem counter-intuitive. We argue, however, that doing so merely redeploys cognitive horsepower to achieve the same ends – greater security, comparative advantage and organisational learning. The paper will elaborate on the benefits of developing such a capability, and provide guidance on how to do so. It will also demonstrate how internal consulting can be blended with intelligence analysis to make the latter more effective. The research presented in this paper borrows from our experience as advisors to security and intelligence organisations, and from research completed under the auspices of the EU-funded VALCRI project. VALCRI (www.valcri.org) is a four-year initiative dedicated to improving the criminal intelligence capabilities of EU member states using a blend of technical and non-technical solutions.

[Presentation available upon request]

 

Recasting the Intelligence Curriculum: Lessons from Two EU Projects

 

Authors: Aleksandra Bielska and Chris Pallaris
Event: “The Second Annual Conference of IAFIE’s EUROPE”, Athens, Greece, 22-24 June 2017

This paper was presented by Aleksandra Bielska during the International Association For Intelligence Education (IAFIE) Conference in Athens on 24 June 2017.

Abstract: The training of intelligence professionals is undermined by the limits of the intelligence cycle. However critical it may be to train analysts in collection, analysis and communication, the evidence suggests that these skills are insufficient to ensuring an effective intelligence capability. This paper argues for the need to broaden existing intelligence curricula to include a broader range of disciplines, including such fields as organisational planning, process design, and information and knowledge management. These are needed to ensure organisations improve routine intelligence activities and address ever-more complex tasks. Further, intelligence programs should look to strengthen meta-cognitive abilities such as creativity, self-management and continuous learning. Recasting the intelligence curriculum will allow us to redefine what an analyst is, where they can contribute, and how they can create value. To realise these ends, educators and practitioners should broaden their understanding of intelligence work so that it is no longer defined by the marshaling of secrets or open source facts. In support of our arguments, we present the results of our work on two EU-funded projects, the FP7-funded VALCRI project (www.valcri.org), and the Global Crisis Response Support Program (www.gcrsp.eu), an extended capacity building project for analysts working in the Americas and the Caribbean. Our paper will also present our work on a new reference curriculum for criminal intelligence professionals, developed under the auspices of the VALCRI project.

[Presentation available upon request]

 

The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis: Where Are We and Where Should We Be?

 

Authors: Aleksandra Bielska and Chris Pallaris
Date of publication: June 2017

This white paper was submitted to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in June 2017.

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Redefining the Intelligence Skill Set Through the Prism of the Intelligence Analysis Impact Model

 

Authors: Aleksandra Bielska and Chris Pallaris
Event: “Intelligence Studies Association Conference”, Baltimore, MD, 22-25 February 2017

This paper was presented by Aleksandra Bielska as part of the panel “The Limits of Reason: Social Sciences and Intelligence Performance” on Friday, 24 February 2017.

Abstract: It is often said that the purpose of intelligence is to support decision making. However, few attempts have been made to define what this means in practice. Inspired by the development of impact models in disciplines such as journalism, this paper looks to bridge the gap between the intentions of the intelligence process and its results. We argue that an impact-based approach has the potential to redefine our understanding of intelligence work, as well as the models that inform it. Our focus, therefore, is on the outcomes and impacts that demonstrate intelligence’s value added. How should they influence the conduct of intelligence professionals? What skill sets are needed to generate such results? And what does this mean for the training and development of intelligence professionals? The research presented in this paper was undertaken under the auspices of the EU-funded VALCRI project, which aims to improve Europe’s criminal intelligence capabilities through a suite of advanced data processing, analytic, and sensemaking tools. VALCRI acknowledges that technology alone cannot address the challenges to effective intelligence work. As such, it has also sought to redefine the standards of intelligence training. The model presented is part of this initiative.

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Improving Professional Training in Criminal Intelligence Analysis

 

Authors: Aleksandra Bielska and Chris Pallaris
Date of publication: 1 January 2017

This white paper details the work of the EU-funded VALCRI project in developing a new syllabus for the development of criminal intelligence analysts.

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A Holistic Training Program for Law Enforcement Analysts

 

Author: Aleksandra Bielska
Event: “International Crime and Intelligence Analysis Conference”, Manchester, England, 25-26 February 2016

This presentation examines the many challenges of intelligence analysis and our efforts to address these challenges. It presents the work of the VALCRI consortium aimed at re-imagining of the training and development of law enforcement analysts.

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Security, Competition and Your Search Skills

 

Author: Chris Pallaris
Event: “Informing (In)Stability: The Security Implications of a Shifting News and Media Environment”, Ottawa, Canada, 22 February 2012

This presentations examines what impact a changing media landscape will have on national security and national competitiveness, and why information literacy remains critical to both.

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The Trouble with Best Practices

 

Author: Chris Pallaris
Event: MCIIS Dungarvan Conference, Ireland, 11-13 July 2010

This  presentation, prepared for the Global Intelligence Forum (The Dungarvan Conference), examines the challenge of applying analytic best practices from four perspectives: definition, perception, application and knowing.

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Contesting Tomorrow: Information, Technology and the Search for Competitive Advantage

 

Author: Chris Pallaris
Event: i-intelligence Executive Briefing, Winterthur, 23 June & 6 July 2010

This briefing examines how traditional notions of competitive advantage are being undone by the twin forces of information and technology.

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